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Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences Records

 Collection
Identifier: 2000-0001

Scope and Content Note

This collection contains records of the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences which are arranged in three series; Series 1: College of Humanities and Social Science, which contains records created by the College as a whole; Series 2: Departments, which contains records produced by the Economics, English, History, Philosophy, Modern Languages, Political Science, Psychology, Social Science, and Statistics departments, as well as some records from the Margaret Morrison Carnegie College; and Series 3: Publications, which houses publications produced by the departments of English and History. The collection spans the period from 1913 through 2007. Except for annual reports, the records are rather lacking from the early years through the 1940s. There are increasingly more records from the 1950s. The bulk of the records span the 1960s through the 1980s. There are a limited number of records from the 1990s.

Dates

  • Majority of material found within 1960-1989
  • 1913-2007

Creator

Restrictions

Information pertaining to personnel procedures, information covered by FERPA, and any salary information will be restricted accordingly.

Records History

During the first years of the Carnegie Institute of Technology (CIT), each of the colleges that comprised CIT employed their own teachers of academic humanities subjects -- Economics, English, History, Mathematics, Modern Languages, and Psychology. In 1917, a planned restructuring brought teachers of like subjects together into a Central Faculty. World War I prevented implementation of the restructuring until 1919, at which time the Central Faculty was renamed the Division of Academic Studies. Shortly thereafter, the administration approved a name change to the Division of General Studies.

Most viewed the Division as a "service" unit, providing academic humanities courses for male students pursuing degrees in the "technical" Divisions of Science and Engineering Arts, Industries, or Applied Psychology. The final Division, Margaret Morrison Carnegie College, provided liberal arts courses for women.

In 1941, the Division of General Studies was reorganized into the Division of Humanistic and Social Studies. Reorganization provided an opportunity for the new Division to overcome the "service" niche in which General Studies had existed. By 1950, the new Division had become a vital part of Carnegie Tech. Students from other Divisions were increasingly taking more humanities courses. This was especially true of the female students at Margaret Morrison. In the 1950s, there was a concerted effort to integrate Margaret Morrison and Engineering and Science students into H and SS courses. In 1962, the administration approved another name change. The Division of Humanistic and Social Studies became the Division of Humanities and Social Sciences.

In 1967, discussion of a "new college for Carnegie Tech" began. Efforts were made to bring the humanities departments together into a cohesive unit and the first class of the "New College" entered in September 1969. However, problems plagued the program from the start and it did not long survive.

During the mid-1970s, the administration took steps to reorganize the collection of departments they had recently acknowledged as the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. The various departments, in truth, had become disjointed, haphazard, and were lacking a common goal. The reorganization of the mid-1970s also included women who would have attended Margaret Morrison, for the college had graduated its last class in the spring of 1969.

The late 1970s and early 1980s saw the development of a core curriculum and the adoption of the phrase "liberal professional education" as an integral part of the mission of the College. The core curriculum and defined mission aided departments in establishing a base on which the College could grow. Statistics formally joined the College in 1981. Philosophy separated from History, becoming its own department, in 1985. The Education Center, which had operated within the college for approximately 15 years, was given a university-wide mission and renamed the University Teaching Center. The academic departments within the College underwent reviews by outside visiting committees during the late 1980s and early 1990s. These efforts were made as an effort to upgrade the image of the College.

On September 7th, 2011, William S. Dietrich II, the former chairman of Dietrich Industries, Inc., a subsidiary of Worthington Industries, Inc., pledged a gift of $265 million. In response to this gift, Carnegie Mellon renamed the college to the Marianna Brown Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences, after William Dietrich's mother.

The founding Dean of the Dietrich College was Erwin Steinberg. Past deans include John Patrick Crecine, Stephen Fienberg, Joel A. Tarr, and Peter Stearns. The current dean is John Lehoczky.

Extent

29.0 Linear feet (29 boxes)

Language

English

Overview

This collection contains records of the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences. The collection spans the period from 1913 through 2007. Except for annual reports, the records are rather lacking from the early years through the 1940s. There are increasingly more records from the 1950s. The bulk of the records span the 1960s through the 1980s. There are a limited number of records from the 1990s and 2000s.

Provenance

This collection was transferred from the Dean's office of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences to the University Archives in stages. The material included in this inventory had reached the Archives by January 2000.

Separations

None.

Processor

Original Processor unknown. Collection rearranged and finding aid updated by Kristofer Adam Speirs, July 2011. Additional writing by Laure Bukh, November 2013.
Title
College of Humanities and Social Sciences Records, 1913-1999
Subtitle
2000.01
Status
Completed
Date
June 4, 2008
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
Undetermined
Script of description
Code for undetermined script

Repository Details

Part of the Carnegie Mellon University Archives Repository

Contact:
4909 Frew St
Pittsburgh PA 15213
(412) 268-5021